Gun Safety Session to Reduce Louisville’s Rising Crime Rate by Teaching Responsibility

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Growing up, originally from Louisville, Marvin Young’s parents never owned a gun, and neither did he for most of his life. However, that all changed four months ago when he changed his mind and decided to join the growing list of American gun owners. “Self-defense,” Young said. “This should be a primary goal for everyone, because you never know when things are going to or will happen.” He said he felt more secure with this on his hip, which is why it shocked him weeks ago when he realized it wasn’t working properly. “I’ve been to the lineup probably less than eight or 10 times, and I’ve never cleaned it,” Young said. “It can still get stuck, but if you don’t clean it up, it increases the chances of it getting stuck.” For gun owners, this is a simple mistake, it will not happen again. However, its story is what many gun experts might fear. “What we learned last year, especially with all the civil unrest, is that African Americans have bought more guns than any other demographic in this country,” said Aaron McMurry, of the Louisville branch of the National African American Gun Association. According to the National Shooting Sports Foundation, since the start of the pandemic, the number of guns in the black community has increased by almost 60%. So McMurry decided to host a gun safety session for the very first time on Saturday, to answer those questions and provide some assistance. “Most households, if you had a gun, you were told there was where the gun was, don’t touch it.” McMurry said his goal was to teach as many people as possible in the black community how to safely own their guns. He believes something will also help slow the ongoing violence in the city. “Everyone has seen what’s going on in the city, haven’t they? We believe that by training our community members to be responsible gun owners, we are preventing the number of guns. enter the community illegally, “McMurry said. McMurry said whether or not you think there are too many guns on the streets, the point is they are there. That’s why, he said, classes and sessions like his are invaluable, as it makes sure that those who have guns are responsible for them. said Young. is a lot of what’s happening nationwide. If you want to be a responsible gun owner, you should really learn the rules. ”McMurry plans to host another event in the coming weeks.

Growing up, originally from Louisville, Marvin Young’s parents never owned a gun, and neither did he for most of his life. However, that all changed four months ago when he changed his mind and decided to join the growing list of American gun owners.

“Self-defense,” Young said. “This should be a primary goal for everyone, because you never know when things are going to or will happen.”

He said he felt more secure with it on his hip, which is why it shocked him weeks ago when he realized it wasn’t working properly.

“I’ve been to the range probably less than eight or 10 times, and I’ve never cleaned it up,” Young said. “It can still get stuck, but if you don’t clean it, it increases the chances of it getting stuck.”

For gun owners, this is a simple mistake, it will not happen again. However, its story is what many gun experts might fear.

“What we learned last year, especially with all the civil unrest, is that African Americans have bought more guns than any other demographic in this country,” said Aaron McMurry, of the Louisville branch of the National African American Gun Association.

According to the National Shooting Sports Foundation, since the start of the pandemic, the number of guns in the black community has increased by almost 60%.

“Now that they have this gun, they’re wondering, what are we doing with this gun now,” McMurry said.

So McMurry decided to host a gun safety session for the very first time on Saturday, to answer those questions and provide some assistance.

“Historically, gun ownership is not something that is typically taught to our young people,” McMurry said. “Most households, if you had a gun, you were told there was where the gun was, don’t touch it.”

McMurry said his goal was to teach as many people as possible in the black community how to safely own their guns. Something will also help slow the ongoing violence in the city, he said.

“Everyone has seen what’s going on in the city, haven’t they? We believe that by training our community members to be responsible gun owners, we are preventing the number of guns. to enter the community illegally, ”McMurry said.

McMurry said if you think there are too many guns on the streets or not, the point is they are there. That’s why, he said, classes and sessions like his are invaluable, because it’s about making sure those who have guns are responsible for them.

“You don’t just go out and buy a gun and that’s it, you’re good to go,” Young said. “But I think, unfortunately, that’s a lot of what’s going on nationally. If you want to be a responsible gun owner, you really should learn the rules.”

McMurry plans to host another event in the coming weeks.


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