Gun safety – Gonv http://gonv.org/ Thu, 19 May 2022 21:16:10 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://gonv.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-3-120x120.png Gun safety – Gonv http://gonv.org/ 32 32 Louisville considers adopting gun safety measures – Boulder Daily Camera https://gonv.org/louisville-considers-adopting-gun-safety-measures-boulder-daily-camera/ Thu, 19 May 2022 00:00:56 +0000 https://gonv.org/louisville-considers-adopting-gun-safety-measures-boulder-daily-camera/ Louisville officials have taken the first steps toward enacting gun safety measures in the city. At Tuesday night’s city council meeting, council members heard the first reading of several new gun violence prevention ordinances. The gun control legislation includes six ordinances in total, including one that would ban the sale and possession of assault rifles. […]]]>

Louisville officials have taken the first steps toward enacting gun safety measures in the city.

At Tuesday night’s city council meeting, council members heard the first reading of several new gun violence prevention ordinances.

The gun control legislation includes six ordinances in total, including one that would ban the sale and possession of assault rifles.

The city council voted unanimously to approve the advancement of the six ordinances of the legislation, which is scheduled for a public hearing on June 7.

If passed, the ordinances will also ban triggers, confirm that the legal age to own firearms in Louisville is 21, restrict possession of “ghost guns” (firearms without a serial number), regulate the open carrying of firearms in certain places, requiring specific signage at firearms dealers and imposing a waiting period for the purchase of firearms.

Following the King Soopers mass shooting in 2021 – which resulted in the deaths of 10 people – Colorado state law now allows municipalities to pass stricter gun regulations than those enforced nationwide. ‘State.

The passage of this legislation is “calculated to reduce threats to residents in public places and the risk of impulsive suicide or crime posed by easily obtainable firearms” in Louisville, according to the prescription document.

The Louisville City Council is drafting its own legislation to be consistent with the Boulder City Council, which is also considering gun safety measures.

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Local gun instructor helps women of color learn gun safety https://gonv.org/local-gun-instructor-helps-women-of-color-learn-gun-safety/ Tue, 17 May 2022 17:52:52 +0000 https://gonv.org/local-gun-instructor-helps-women-of-color-learn-gun-safety/ VIRGINIA BEACH, Va. (WAVY) – The Firearms industryStry Trade Association revealed that at least 5.4 million people bought a firearm for the first time last year. In the first six months of 2021, nearly 87% of gun stores nationwide saw an increase in the number of African American women buying guns. It is the group […]]]>

VIRGINIA BEACH, Va. (WAVY) – The Firearms industryStry Trade Association revealed that at least 5.4 million people bought a firearm for the first time last year.

In the first six months of 2021, nearly 87% of gun stores nationwide saw an increase in the number of African American women buying guns.

It is the group of local firearms instructors that Joel Jones aims to teach firearms safety.

“If you want something done, you have to bring in the women. If the men aren’t doing what they’re supposed to do in terms of teaching and leading, we’ve got the women who have been doing it forever,” Jones said.

10 On Your Side attended one of his classes at the Top pawn and gun shooting range for training on Mother’s Day.

One of her students, Andrea Triplett, who is now a gun owner, said she believed black women started buying guns at a time when issues of racial injustice were at the fore. foreground.

“George Floyd, Black Lives Matter, a lot of women being single like me, so I need to be able to protect myself. I don’t depend on anyone else to do that, so I put it in my hands,” Triplett said .

Now she comes to the shooting range every two weeks to get used to her gun and learn as much safety as possible from Jones.

“It’s definitely worth learning defense. It’s not just about guns; you learn the laws and how to live with them,” Triplett said.

From conversations to hands-on practice, Jones coaches them every step of the way.

“As they become more comfortable with the gun, God forbid if they ever have to deploy that gun in self-defense, they won’t hesitate,” explained Jones.

He said you can also rent guns to learn before you feel comfortable enough to buy one.

“If I can take one person, train them in gun safety and they keep doing it, they can do the same thing with someone else,” Jones said.

If you want to learn more about gun safety, click here to connect to Jones courses.

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“Accepting Responsibility” – CBS Denver https://gonv.org/accepting-responsibility-cbs-denver/ Sun, 01 May 2022 15:39:00 +0000 https://gonv.org/accepting-responsibility-cbs-denver/ DENVER (CBS4) – Within days of each other, two young Colorado children died after getting their hands on guns; a 3-year-old boy died on South Pecos Street on April 17; a 6-year-old boy died in Fort Collins from a self-inflicted gunshot wound on April 10. Despite passing legislation to prevent such deaths from happening, advocates […]]]>

DENVER (CBS4) – Within days of each other, two young Colorado children died after getting their hands on guns; a 3-year-old boy died on South Pecos Street on April 17; a 6-year-old boy died in Fort Collins from a self-inflicted gunshot wound on April 10.

Despite passing legislation to prevent such deaths from happening, advocates on both sides say it is really the responsibility of the parents.

(credit: CBS)

“If we want these freedoms, we have to accept the responsibilities that come with these freedoms,” said Edgar Antillon, co-founder of Guns for Everyone. “It’s not accidental. It’s more of a careless thing. Parents who are careless with their firearms are not responsible.

Abbey Winter, a volunteer with the Colorado chapter of Moms Demand Action, said deaths like these are 100% preventable.

“These children have a right to life, and it’s up to adults to prevent access to these guns,” Winter said.

Antillon said the freedom to carry a gun means taking steps to properly secure them.

“Part of it is doing something as simple as having a basic lock,” Antillon said. “There are so many options for securing your firearm.”

Below Colorado law passed in 2021gun owners must keep their guns in a safe if there are children under 18 in the house or face misdemeanor charges.

(credit: CBS)

“It could be a code safe. Ideally, it could be a biometric safe, and you could go so far as to attach or bolt them to your wall, so that the safe cannot then be removed by older children,” Winter said.

Winter and Antillon both acknowledged that guns are dangerous, but said safety is possible and that with proper education, deaths like these can be prevented.

“It’s up to parents to be responsible for guns, it’s up to those parents to lock those guns up, or at least make them inaccessible to people who shouldn’t have access to those guns,” he said. Antillon said.

Most gun purchases come with a padlock. Many organizations like Moms Demand Action also give out free gun locks.

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WFPD sees more gun safety than national trend https://gonv.org/wfpd-sees-more-gun-safety-than-national-trend/ Mon, 25 Apr 2022 22:53:47 +0000 https://gonv.org/wfpd-sees-more-gun-safety-than-national-trend/ WICHITA FALLS (KFDX/KJTL) — In a grim first for the United States as firearm-related deaths overtook car crashes as the leading cause of youth deaths in 2020 after the CDC reported an increase in 29.5% compared to the previous year. But here at home in Wichita Falls, it’s a problem Sgt. Charlie Eipper and the […]]]>

WICHITA FALLS (KFDX/KJTL) — In a grim first for the United States as firearm-related deaths overtook car crashes as the leading cause of youth deaths in 2020 after the CDC reported an increase in 29.5% compared to the previous year.

But here at home in Wichita Falls, it’s a problem Sgt. Charlie Eipper and the Wichita Falls Police Department said it’s not as prevalent as one might think.

“We work these cases from time to time, but we don’t see it as something that becomes a chronic problem,” Eipper said. “Sometimes stories have even been told that someone else shot them and when we start the investigation we find out it was an accidental discharge.”

CDC statistics in Texas confirm this, with the state ranking 26th in gun-related deaths per 100,000 in 2020.

As well as lower rates for ages 1-19, at nearly 22%, for each of the bordering states of Oklahoma at just over 22%, New Mexico at 23%, and Arkansas at 31 %.

Eipper also highlighted the safety and training measures taken by many people around Texoma and across the state, which the WFPD strongly suggests everyone participate in.

“Like anything else, any other type of training, it takes repetition and you have to do it often because if you don’t, that’s when accidental discharges are more common. “It’s after you lose some of those skills and it’s not muscle memory anymore. That’s something you have to think about and that’s where the crashes happen,” Eipper said.

With this training continuing as Texas expands open carry laws, Eipper thinks Wichita Falls could see those stats improve.

“I think those numbers will go down. We will have fewer cases of accidental discharge, they will happen because we are people and we make mistakes, but we can definitely reduce them with training,” Eipper said.

Familiarization and training to prevent a possible disaster.

The WFPD actually has hundreds of free gun locks available at the Flood Street Training Center for those looking for an extra way to protect their firearms!

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Sagadahoc Sheriff’s Office to conduct gun safety training in wake of 2021 shootings https://gonv.org/sagadahoc-sheriffs-office-to-conduct-gun-safety-training-in-wake-of-2021-shootings/ Mon, 25 Apr 2022 21:40:20 +0000 https://gonv.org/sagadahoc-sheriffs-office-to-conduct-gun-safety-training-in-wake-of-2021-shootings/ The Sagadahoc County Sheriff’s Office will be hosting a free two-night citizen training on handgun safety at West Bath Fire Station from 6-8 p.m. May 2-3 in response to the 2021 shootings during where children got their hands on unsecured firearms. The course will cover a range of safety topics, including safe storage and proper […]]]>

The Sagadahoc County Sheriff’s Office will be hosting a free two-night citizen training on handgun safety at West Bath Fire Station from 6-8 p.m. May 2-3 in response to the 2021 shootings during where children got their hands on unsecured firearms.

The course will cover a range of safety topics, including safe storage and proper loading technique, according to Sagadahoc County Sheriff Joel Merry.

“Anyone can walk into a store and walk out the proud owner of a 9mm, whether you know how to use that 9mm or not,” said Merry, who served as the county’s sheriff for 13 years. “That’s what we want to make sure that people know what the gun is capable of and how it should be handled properly.”

According to Geoff Bickford, executive director of the Maine Gun Safety Coalition, cable locks can help keep firearms safe and out of reach of children. The Coalition purchases and distributes missing cables through law enforcement offices and pediatricians. Contribution / Maine Gun Safety Coalition

sergeant. Aaron Skolfield, firearms instructor for the Maine Criminal Justice Academy, will lead both sessions, according to Merry. Participants, who can register by calling or visiting the sheriff’s office, should not bring their own weapons to the training.

Two accidental shootings involving children in West Bath last year sparked the safety program, Merry said.

Stephen R. Ambrose, 24, and Ian Carr, 25, have both been charged with endangering the welfare of a child in separate incidents involving toddlers finding and firing handguns loaded and unsecured, according to the Sagadahoc County Sheriff’s Office. Carr’s 2-year-old son found Carr’s 9mm handgun on a bedside table and fired a single shot that injured both his sleeping parents last May.

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“In both cases, there was, in my view, a clear lack of respect around the proper storage and handling of firearms, particularly around young people,” Merry said. “At the heart of this (training program) is safety first.”

The problem of gun violence is getting worse, according to Geoff Bickford, executive director of the Maine Gun Safety Coalition.

“More people are being shot and killed with guns now than a year or 10 years ago,” said Bickford, whose organization promotes gun safety practices and legislation. “It’s a real problem in Maine.”

Guns kill an average of 146 people in Maine each year, or 9.9 per 100,000 people, according to Everytown Research & Policy. This rate increased by 20% between 2009 and 2018, slightly more than the national average.

Bickford cited several factors behind the rise in gun deaths, including soaring teenage mental illness and suicide rates across the country.

When people attempt suicide by drug overdose or other methods, they often survive, recover and lead healthy lives, Bickford said. But when teenagers, who are more impulsive than adults, have access to unsecured firearms, they rarely have that chance.

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“You can stitch up a wound,” Bickford said. “You can pump a stomach. You can’t put your head back.

Both Bickford and Merry pointed to a dramatic increase in gun purchases during the pandemic as a contributor to increased gun violence. New gun owners may be less likely to understand the basics of gun safety than those who were raised to respect the dangers of guns, Merry said.

Although the Maine Gun Safety Coalition does not advocate the elimination of gun ownership rights, Bickford argued that lawmakers should require that gun owners receive at least some safety training.

“You can’t go buy a car and drive it off the lot unless you have a driver’s license,” he said. “Why? Because it’s a massive killing machine that, if in the wrong hands, can wreak havoc on society. A gun is no different.

Although Maine does not require any safety training for gun owners, Merry hopes Sagadahoc County gun owners will voluntarily take on the responsibility during trainings next week.

“People have the right to buy guns,” Merry said. “I just want to make sure people do it safely.”

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Torres and gun safety advocates announce new federal push to limit phantom guns – Bronx Times https://gonv.org/torres-and-gun-safety-advocates-announce-new-federal-push-to-limit-phantom-guns-bronx-times/ Mon, 25 Apr 2022 16:25:18 +0000 https://gonv.org/torres-and-gun-safety-advocates-announce-new-federal-push-to-limit-phantom-guns-bronx-times/ After a ghost gun was used in the recent shooting death of a teenager in Mott Haven, a Bronx lawmaker is ready to act federally. U.S. Representative Ritchie Torres was joined by Bronx Borough President Vanessa Gibson, Bronx District Attorney Darcel Clark, gun safety advocates and violence healing groups, on 15 April, when he announced […]]]>

After a ghost gun was used in the recent shooting death of a teenager in Mott Haven, a Bronx lawmaker is ready to act federally.

U.S. Representative Ritchie Torres was joined by Bronx Borough President Vanessa Gibson, Bronx District Attorney Darcel Clark, gun safety advocates and violence healing groups, on 15 April, when he announced new federal legislation that would allow individuals and families affected by ghost guns to sue manufacturers. This year, the NYPD has already removed 34 ghost guns from the streets of the Bronx.

The legislation comes in response to recent high-profile shootings in the Bronx, where Angellyh Yambo, 16, was murdered on April 9 by stray bullets at the corner of East 156th Street and Saint Ann Avenue, and in brooklyn where Frank James allegedly fired into a subway, injuring 23 people, 10 of whom were shot. The legislation also aims to address the increase in gun violence in New York and the United States.

While there are bills that repeal the Bush-era law that granted gun manufacturers immunity from civil suits, none extend to manufacturers of partially assembled or partially assembled guns. of unnumbered guns and gun parts, also known as ghost guns.

A privately assembled and untraceable firearm, ghost guns do not have a unique serial number engraved by a licensed manufacturer or importer. In 2021, 20,000 ghost weapons were recovered by law enforcement in criminal investigations across the United States, a tenfold increase since 2016. Torres’ legislation would like to removing the liability shield on manufacturers who produce any component of a ghost weapon, allowing victims of gun violence and their families a private right of action.

Frank James smiles as he is loaded into a police cruiser at the East Village 9th Precinct on April 13. Photo Dean Moses

“The epidemic of gun violence is out of control and it’s too glaring a crisis to ignore,” Torres said. “In the past week alone, there have been several fatal cases of gun violence across New York City, including the death of a 16-year-old girl in the Bronx and several serious injuries during the terrorist attack in Brooklyn. These recent shootings are not isolated cases. We have seen a substantial increase in gun violence in New York and the United States over the past year, and it is high time to adopt a federal legislation that addresses the proliferation of untraceable firearms throughout the country.

According to NYPD data, there have been 1,207 firearm arrests since the start of 2020 and a 16% increase in shootings between March 2021 and 2022.

According to a Everytown for Gun Safety report, the rise of phantom guns is the fastest growing gun safety issue in the nation. The report found that 68% of existing online sellers today started selling ghost gun parts after 2014. Sellers provide all the parts needed for a working ghost gun and claim that key ghost gun parts can be manufactured in as little as 15 minutes, often at prices below assembled firearms sold at retail.

Life has become a nightmare for Bronx residents, and the hope is that the legislation will get more guns off the streets and help people be safer, Torres said.

“It shouldn’t take gun violence and death in our communities to pass gun safety legislation that allows victims to hold manufacturers accountable,” Torres said. “I am proud to introduce a long-awaited bill that will allow victims and their families to seek justice in civil court. I hope Congress will move quickly to pass this important bill.

Clark, the Bronx District Attorney, is becoming more accustomed to attending vigils and rallies after Bronxites die of senseless gun violence. Clark praised Torres for his legislation and added that children love Yambo shouldn’t have to die on the way home from school, she said.

“As we stand on 161st Street, I don’t see any stores where you can buy guns,” Clark said. “We can have laws, but we have to stop the flow of guns.”

Among the gun safety advocates at the press conference were Save Our Streets (SOS), which operates in Crown Heights and Bedford-Stuyvesant in Brooklyn, and the Bronx neighborhoods of Mott Haven and Morrisania.

Marisol Rivera, a violence switcher with SOS, pointed out that the gun isn’t their only option. Children need to know they can do more than commit crimes, she said.

“Don’t let a short-term fix change your life forever,” Rivera said. “Our babies are dying. We should be upset. We have to do better.”

Marisol Rivera, a violence switch with SOS, said the incessant shooting had to stop.

In October 2021 Governor Kathy Hochul banned ghost guns as well as the making or possession of so-called “toy guns” — real weapons designed to look like a child’s toy — and sign a bill that criminalizes the possession of unfinished firearm frames and receivers by anyone other than a licensed gunsmith.

On April 11, President Joe Biden announces that the US Department of Justice has issued a final rule to curb the proliferation of phantom weapons. This final rule prohibits the business of making the most accessible ghost guns, such as unserialized “buy build shoot” kits that individuals can purchase online or in a store without background checks and can easily be assembled into a weapon functional in as little as 30 minutes. with the equipment they have at home. This rule also clarifies that these kits are considered “firearms” under gun control law.

The final rule will also help turn some phantom guns already in circulation into serialized firearms. Through this rule, the Department of Justice requires federally licensed dealers and gunsmiths to take any firearm without a serial number from inventory to serialize that gun.

Contact Jason Cohen at jcohen@schnepsmedia.com or (718) 260-4598. For more coverage follow us on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram @bronxtimes

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The Dummy Gun Reviews America’s Gun Safety Laws | PR https://gonv.org/the-dummy-gun-reviews-americas-gun-safety-laws-pr/ Wed, 20 Apr 2022 22:50:34 +0000 https://gonv.org/the-dummy-gun-reviews-americas-gun-safety-laws-pr/ More than 16 million American adults purchased a firearm in 2020, an increase of more than 20% year over year from 13.8 million in 2019. The non-profit organization Guns Down America enlisted Energy BBDO to create a visceral and thought-provoking national campaign that makes people think twice about making such a purchase. The campaign, titled […]]]>

More than 16 million American adults purchased a firearm in 2020, an increase of more than 20% year over year from 13.8 million in 2019.

The non-profit organization Guns Down America enlisted Energy BBDO to create a visceral and thought-provoking national campaign that makes people think twice about making such a purchase.

The campaign, titled “Gun Survivor Reviews”, alters the gun reviews that people post on YouTube, explaining the uses and benefits of guns. These videos, however, feature real survivors of gun violence who have struggled with abuse, escalated arguments, or attempted murders.

The videos begin similarly to typical gun reviews, but end with the narrator’s personal story of how the gun was used to shoot them.

“We read an article in the Chicago Grandstand about a 15-year-old boy shot three times,” Ze Baldwin, BBDO’s associate creative director, told Campaign US. reminded us of a gun review. So we knocked it down.”

While the two gun violence survivors featured in the videos – Nicole and Kate – were excited about the project, it took “courage to expose themselves and relive such a difficult time”, Baldwin said.

“Right from the start, Nicole and Kate found the idea very impactful,” he added. “They were bold and brave to relive their stories and acted professionally from the first take, putting in maximum effort to make it real.”

The campaign is taking place on digital and social platforms, where it is being promoted by key influencers who have expressed support for gun safety laws, said Ioana Filip, executive creative director at BBDO.

To date, the campaign has organically reached over 100,000 views across all channels.

The reach is only as strong as the survivor stories, which continue to be added to the campaign as they arrive.

“We will be adding content as the campaign unfolds on GunSurvivorReviews.com“, said Filip. “More survivors have bravely reached out and want to express their own stories and create criticism.

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Reduce Military and Veteran Suicide by Promoting Gun Safety https://gonv.org/reduce-military-and-veteran-suicide-by-promoting-gun-safety/ Wed, 20 Apr 2022 19:08:01 +0000 https://gonv.org/reduce-military-and-veteran-suicide-by-promoting-gun-safety/ As the Department of Defense ramps up suicide prevention efforts focused on gun safety, the CEO of Stop Soldier Suicide shares data to put the issue in context, and a military widow shares her story and how she found healing and hope in the eight years since her husband’s death by suicide. About the guests: […]]]>

As the Department of Defense ramps up suicide prevention efforts focused on gun safety, the CEO of Stop Soldier Suicide shares data to put the issue in context, and a military widow shares her story and how she found healing and hope in the eight years since her husband’s death by suicide.

About the guests:

Chris Ford is the CEO of Stop Soldier Suicide, where he is responsible for the strategic direction and day-to-day management of the organization. He is the founder of the National Association of Veteran-Serving Organizations, or NAVSO, and a 20-year veteran of the Air Force. He retired in 2014 from the Joint Chiefs of Staff, where he served in the Office of the Chairman of Warrior and Family Support. In this role, he has used his perspective on veteran reintegration to help communities across the country looking to improve their support for military families. Ford previously served in nearly a dozen countries around the world in support of Operations Southern Watch, Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom. He was awarded the Bronze Star Medal and graduated from the United States Air Force Academy, the University of South Carolina, the Naval Postgraduate School, the FBI National Academy, and the Boots-to-Business program. from Syracuse University.

Amber James is a Texan, single mother and surviving wife of a Marine Corps veteran. She is a strong advocate for mental health and suicide prevention. She is certified and trained as a Laughter Yoga Leader, Life and Weight Loss Coach, and Erotic Shots Coach. She is also a widowed suicide peer mentor for the Tragedy Survivors Assistance Program and a suicide death support group facilitator for the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention. James’ goal is to inspire hope and show that healing is possible through awareness and conversations by sharing his story.

About the podcast:

The Spouse Angle is a podcast breaking down the news for military spouses and their families. Each episode features subject matter experts and military guests who dive into current affairs from a military perspective – everything from new policy changes to research on family lifestyle challenges. The podcast is hosted by Natalie Gross, a freelance journalist and former Military Times reporter who grew up in a military family.

Follow the angle of the joint on instagram, Facebook and Twitter.

Subscribe on Apple podcast.

Subscribe on Spotify.

Subscribe on embroiderer.

Veterans dealing with a mental health emergency can contact the Veterans Crisis Line at 1-800-273-8255 and select Option 1 for a VA staff member. Veterans, Troops or their family members can also text 838255 or visit VeteransCrisisLine.net help.

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Dummy gun reviews push America’s gun safety laws https://gonv.org/dummy-gun-reviews-push-americas-gun-safety-laws/ Wed, 20 Apr 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://gonv.org/dummy-gun-reviews-push-americas-gun-safety-laws/ More than 16 million American adults purchased a firearm in 2020, an increase of more than 20% year-over-year from 13.8 million in 2019. Non-profit organization Guns Down America enlisted Energy BBDO to create a visceral and inspirational national campaign that makes people think twice about making such a purchase. The campaign, titled “Gun Survivor Reviews”, […]]]>

More than 16 million American adults purchased a firearm in 2020, an increase of more than 20% year-over-year from 13.8 million in 2019.

Non-profit organization Guns Down America enlisted Energy BBDO to create a visceral and inspirational national campaign that makes people think twice about making such a purchase.

The campaign, titled “Gun Survivor Reviews”, alters the gun reviews that people post on YouTube, explaining the uses and benefits of guns. These videos, however, feature real survivors of gun violence who have struggled with abuse, escalated arguments, or attempted murders.

The videos begin similarly to typical gun reviews, but end with the narrator’s personal story of how the gun was used to shoot them.

“We read an article in the Chicago Grandstand about a 15-year-old boy shot three times,” Ze Baldwin, BBDO’s associate creative director, told Campaign US. reminded us of a gun review. So we knocked it down.”

While the two gun violence survivors featured in the videos – Nicole and Kate – were excited about the project, it took “courage to expose themselves and relive such a difficult time,” Baldwin said.

“Right from the start, Nicole and Kate found the idea very impactful,” he added. “They were bold and brave to relive their stories and acted professionally from the first take, putting in maximum effort to make it real.”

The campaign is taking place on digital and social platforms, where it is being promoted by key influencers who have expressed support for gun safety laws, said Ioana Filip, executive creative director at BBDO.

To date, the campaign has organically reached over 100,000 views across all channels.

The reach is only as strong as the survivor stories, which continue to be added to the campaign as they arrive.

“We will add content as the campaign unfolds on GunSurvivorReviews.com“, said Filip. “More survivors have bravely reached out and want to express their own stories and create criticism.

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Idaho students pushed for gun safety resolution, but lawmakers didn’t introduce it https://gonv.org/idaho-students-pushed-for-gun-safety-resolution-but-lawmakers-didnt-introduce-it/ Tue, 19 Apr 2022 23:43:35 +0000 https://gonv.org/idaho-students-pushed-for-gun-safety-resolution-but-lawmakers-didnt-introduce-it/ For months, high school students in Idaho worked with state lawmakers to craft a resolution on gun violence. They prepared moving testimonies about the loss of family or friends to suicide, the feelings of numbness from active fire drills, and the fears they had when loved ones with mental health issues had access to firearms. […]]]>

For months, high school students in Idaho worked with state lawmakers to craft a resolution on gun violence. They prepared moving testimonies about the loss of family or friends to suicide, the feelings of numbness from active fire drills, and the fears they had when loved ones with mental health issues had access to firearms. They expected to read it before a committee of legislators.

But the students never had the chance to share these stories publicly.

The students said they were frustrated and disappointed that what they considered a reasonable solution was not presented. They had spent weeks meeting with state legislators, many of whom they said were supportive and enthusiastic about the student involvement.

The draft resolution recognized the importance of the Second Amendment and the Idaho Constitution, acknowledged the impact of “preventable tragedies” and encouraged “responsible gun safety and safe storage.”

“I think for us, it’s so simple. This (resolution) literally recognizes that there are people dying that we should care about,” said Amaia Clayton, a student at Renaissance High School in Meridian. “And then it immediately becomes a political issue.”

Resolution acknowledges impact of gun violence

Last fall, the student group worked on a bill that would have required a license for minors to buy guns. The goal was to slow down the process by which minors purchase a firearm, so that students in the midst of a mental health crisis could not access a firearm as easily.

Several of the students involved have taken a safety course themselves, where they were able to feel more comfortable with firearms after learning how to use them safely and gaining insight into others’ experience with guns. fire. They wanted to make sure they were educated on the issue before seeking to change the laws.

The students had contacted Senator Melissa Wintrow, D-Boise. Wintrow said when students came to see her, she took their concerns seriously. They weren’t the first students to contact her about it, she said.

“They were telling me stories about how many kids had access to guns, and they’re worried,” she said. “We owe them at least to listen.”

In Idaho, gun conversations are often difficult, Wintrow said.

Wintrow suggested that the students instead work together on a resolution that would raise awareness and educate the public about the issue. The students said they believe they have a better chance of winning support for the resolution, which does not have the weight of law.

“A lot of the time reasonable conversation is stifled because of extremists saying, ‘You’re going to take our guns away from us,'” she said.

The draft resolution, shared with the statesman, recognized the Second Amendment and the Idaho Constitution, which states that hunting is “a valuable part of the patrimony of the State of Idaho and shall be preserved forever for the people”.

He pointed out that people who want to get a hunting license in the state must complete a hunter education and safety course, noted that the Idaho code does not address “responsible access and safe storage of firearms” in places where young people under the age of 18 may be, and included statistics on people who have committed suicide with a firearm.

The Idaho Violent Death Reporting System reported that among people who died by suicide in Idaho between 2014 and 2020, approximately 61% used a firearm. Idaho consistently ranks in the top 10 US states for suicide deaths, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

“The Idaho Legislature encourages Idaho residents and institutions to continue to educate, promote, and implement safety precautions for firearm access and storage,” the draft says. of resolution.

Students met with more than a dozen lawmakers on the resolution

While working on the resolution, the student group gained support from more than 100 students across the state, who added their names to sponsor the resolution. They said they met with more than a dozen lawmakers, Democrats and Republicans, many of whom were enthusiastic about their ideas.

“The resounding response we received from most senators was, ‘That’s great. It’s great,” said Kate Stevens, a Boise High School student who led the effort.

But some lawmakers worried about linking suicide to guns and feared the resolution could lead to new legislation restricting access to guns, the students said. Lawmakers have also balked over the clause encouraging the safe storage of firearms.

The National Rifle Association said on its website that it offers “a variety of programs and services to promote the safe handling, use, and storage of firearms.” He recommends people store firearms so that they are not accessible to unauthorized persons.

The students wanted the resolution presented to the Senate State Affairs Committee. The students said they spoke several times with Senator Patti Anne Lodge, who chairs the committee. They said she was supportive from the start, but expressed concerns about parts of the resolution. Lodge did not respond to a request for comment.

Wintrow said the NRA didn’t like the resolution’s language.

“These students just wanted a tiny little corner of their government,” she said. “I think when they see some of the other bills allowed to be printed and tabled, it’s hard to (understand) why this very simple resolution that doesn’t even have the force of law can’t be considered.”

Stevens said lawmakers should be open to hearing the facts and ways that would help make access to guns safer and reduce deaths. No one is interested in taking away anyone’s rights, she said.

“It seems very simple,” Stevens said. “And it’s frustrating that it’s been portrayed as a problem that it’s not.”

Students said they felt some lawmakers were out of touch with the issues they were raising. Simon Richardson, a Boise High student, said most of them had someone in their life who had attempted suicide or died.

Last year, a sixth-grade girl at a college in Rigby injured three people in a shooting. The girl had a handgun in her backpack and fired several bullets before a teacher disarmed her. No one died.

The shooting appears to be the second shooting at an Idaho school that has resulted in an injury. In 1999, a 15-year-old boy fired two gunshots inside Notus Junior-Senior High School, according to The Associated Press. A student was injured by a ricocheting shell.

“We’re all scared to go to school,” Richardson told the Statesman. “I don’t think there are many students at any of our schools who aren’t afraid of a shooting at a very real and potential school.”

Students share stories of suicides, lockdowns

Last year, Stevens said a family member and friend attempted suicide. His grandfather, who survived, had no weapon. About a month and a half later, a friend of his attempted suicide.

Stevens said she was grateful every day that none of them had access to guns. While her grandfather had a handgun for a while, her parents demanded that he get rid of it so she and her brother wouldn’t be in the house with a gun, he said. she declared.

“You don’t realize what you have until you almost lose it,” she said. “As a student, you hear about it every day. We are so numb that we laugh. Because if we don’t, we cry.

Richardson remembers when he was in elementary school, his school was closed because there was a man outside with a gun. He remembers that when he was 8 years old, he was crying in the school library and hiding behind a rocking chair, fearing that the man would enter the school.

Students said they fear school shootings and gun suicides every day.

“Not a day goes by that none of that comes to mind, like a suicide, a school shooting, a mass shooting, none of that. Each day. Every day it comes to my mind and it’s like, why am I living with this? I’m 17,” Clayton said.

The students said they still didn’t know where to go from here. They feel like they are on the verge of getting a resolution and bringing more attention to this issue, and nothing has come of it.

He said he didn’t feel heard and couldn’t understand why no action was being taken. But the students said they plan to continue their work – to raise awareness of the issue, try to stop gun deaths and provide support for survivors of gun violence.

“We say to ourselves, what do we do now? We have tried everything with the Legislative Assembly. It’s a growing problem, and it feels like they’re just ignoring it,” Richardson said. “And it will only get worse.”

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